Urinary Incontinence

Urinary incontinence — the loss of bladder control — is a common and often embarrassing problem. The severity ranges from occasionally leaking urine when you cough or sneeze to having an urge to urinate that’s so sudden and strong you don’t get to a toilet in time. Urinary incontinence is a common problem that affects many people

Urinary incontinence is the involuntary leakage of urine. It means a person urinates when they do not want to. Control over the urinary sphincter is either lost or weakened. 

Types of urinary incontinence include:

  • Stress incontinence. Urine leaks when you exert pressure on your bladder by coughing, sneezing, laughing, exercising, or lifting something heavy.
  • Urge incontinence. You have a sudden, intense urge to urinate followed by an involuntary loss of urine. You may need to urinate often, including throughout the night. Urge incontinence may be caused by a minor condition, such as infection, or a more severe condition such as a neurological disorder or diabetes.
  • Overflow incontinence. You experience frequent or constant dribbling of urine due to a bladder that doesn’t empty completely.
  • Functional incontinence. A physical or mental impairment keeps you from making it to the toilet in time. For example, if you have severe arthritis, you may not be able to unbutton your pants quickly enough.
  • Mixed incontinence. You experience more than one type of urinary incontinence — most often this refers to a combination of stress incontinence and urge incontinence.

Urinary incontinence can be caused by everyday habits, underlying medical conditions or physical problems. A thorough evaluation by your doctor can help determine what’s behind your incontinence. 

Causes for Urinary incontinence:

  • Pregnancy. Hormonal changes and the increased weight of the fetus can lead to stress incontinence.
  • Childbirth. Vaginal delivery can weaken muscles needed for bladder control and damage bladder nerves and supportive tissue, leading to a dropped (prolapsed) pelvic floor. With prolapse, the bladder, uterus, rectum, or small intestine can get pushed down from the usual position and protrude into the vagina. Such protrusions may be associated with incontinence.
  • Changes with age. The aging of the bladder muscle can decrease the bladder’s capacity to store urine. Also, involuntary bladder contractions become more frequent as you get older.
  • Menopause. After menopause, women produce less estrogen, a hormone that helps keep the lining of the bladder and urethra healthy. Deterioration of these tissues can aggravate incontinence.
  • Enlarged prostate. Especially in older men, incontinence often stems from enlargement of the prostate gland, a condition known as benign prostatic hyperplasia.
  • Prostate cancer. In men, stress incontinence or urge incontinence can be associated with untreated prostate cancer. But more often, incontinence is a side effect of treatments for prostate cancer.
  • Obstruction. A tumor anywhere along your urinary tract can block the normal flow of urine, leading to overflow incontinence. Urinary stones — hard, stonelike masses that form in the bladder — sometimes cause urine leakage.
  • Neurological disorders. Multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, a stroke, a brain tumor, or a spinal injury can interfere with nerve signals involved in bladder control, causing urinary incontinence.

Prevention

Urinary incontinence isn’t always preventable. However, to help decrease your risk:

  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Practice pelvic floor exercises
  • Avoid bladder irritants, such as caffeine, alcohol, and acidic foods
  • Eat more fiber, which can prevent constipation, a cause of urinary incontinence
  • Don’t smoke, or seek help to quit if you’re a smoke

Urinary Catheter: A tube that goes from the bladder, through the urethra, out of the body into a bag that collects urine.

Absorbent pads: A wide range of absorbent pads is available to purchase at pharmacies and supermarkets, as well as online

Will the NDIS fund my incontinence products?

If your continence issues are as a result of your disability, your continence products and aids should be funded through your NDIS plan.

NDIS & Urinary Incontinence:

If you are experiencing loss of bladder control it may be an indication that you could qualify for disability insurance benefits. NDIS will typically fund continence supports for participants five or older who regularly experience incontinence, day or night. The cost is likely to meet our funding criteria.

P home care is a registered NDIS provider and managed by 20 years experienced Registered Nurse. We provide incontinence assessment, wound care, catheter changes throughout NSW. We support the mental health team with new NDIS applications and community nursing support. Philips home care offer Incontinence care services under NDIS

For continence assessments, therapy and reviews at our Continence Services, support is funded under Capacity Building – Improved Daily Living

For more information or to register with us, please leave your details below and we will call you back to arrange an appointment. These supports are available throughout the New south Wales with group-based activities based in centers at Liverpool, Taree,  Blacktown, Penrith, The Hills,  Blue Mountains, Bargara – Innes Park, Hervey Bay, Warwick, Yeppoon, Bundaberg, Maryborough, Mackay,  Emerald, Gladstone, Dalby, Gympie, Townsville, Mount Isa, Cairns, Rockhampton, Bongaree- Woorim, Sunshine coast, Nambour, Toowoomba, Gold coast. Brisbane, Perth, Bunbury, Geraldton, Kalgoorlie-Boulder, Albany, Busselton, Karratha, Broome, Port Hedland.

Please do contact us at 1800 571 955 or write to us at ndis@phomecare.com.au

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